• home
  • about
  • updates
  • publications
  • press
  • contact
  • rubrics
  • forum
  • training
  • results
  • closing the loop

ACRL Framework rubric - Searching as Strategic Exploration

The following rubric is one of three, all derived from the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (2016) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, that will begin the Bloomsburg University approval process in fall, 2017.  They have been developed for a required course for English majors at with an information literacy component; assessment is currently based on the Information Literacy VALUE Rubric (2009) of the American Association of Colleges & Universities. The rubrics have received some positive initial reception from the department and university communities.  They are published here to represent one conception of the ACRL Framework and, hopefully, to inspire dialogue and questioning.
 
The rubrics have four innovative features.  First, they organize the three components of the Framework – frame, dispositions, and knowledge practices – so that each rubric addresses one frame; the dispositions are treated as learning outcomes or objectives, and the knowledge practices are treated as descriptors (in this rubric, evidence of dispositional development).  Second, scorers are not limited to any one set of learning practices for assessing progress in acquiring dispositions, but can draw on any practice relevant to the disposition.  Third, the subject need not apply all or even most of the learning practices nor demonstrate acquisition of all the dispositions to attain an “expert” score; quality is more important than coverage. And fourth, each rubric is intended to be applied at once both to an artifact and to a structured reflection upon that artifact.  Sample prompts for reflections on all three rubrics are included on the last page.
 
Terry Riley
Bloomsburg University
 
ACRL Information Literacy Rubric
ENGLISH 203: Approaches to Literary Study
Concepts, Dispositions, and Knowledge Practices drawn from Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Three of the Framework’s six concepts included.  Modifications of language bracketed.  Bracketed ellipsis […] indicates Dispositions or Knowledge Practices excluded from the rubric.
Assessment should be based both on artifacts and student reflections; a single artifact and reflection could be sufficient, if the artifact is intellectually ambitious and purposeful, and if the reflection addresses two or more of the Frames.  Neither all the Dispositions nor all the Learning Practices need be represented for the student to score at the Expert level.
ACRL Frame:      
 Searching  
    as 
 Strategic      
 Exploration
 
Dispositions:Learners who are developing IL (exploratory) abilities
ACRL Knowledge Practices
      (Expert:
        Capstone 4)
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL
[exploratory] abilities
 ACRL Knowledge   
 Practices
          (Milestone 3)
 
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL
[exploratory] abilities
ACRL Knowledge Practices
      (Milestone 2)
 
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL [exploratory] abilities
ACRL Knowledge   
 Practices
          (Novice:
             Benchmark 1)
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL
[exploratory] abilities
Benchmark not met 0
-- exhibit mental flexibility and creativity
 
-- understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results
 
-- realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search
 
-- seek guidance from experts, such as librarians, researchers, and professionals
 
-- recognize the value of browsing and other serendipitous methods of information gathering
 
-- persist in the face of search challenges, and know when they have enough information to complete the information task
-- determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs;
 
-- identify interested parties, such as scholars, organizations, governments, and industries, who might produce information about a topic and then determine how to access that information;
 
-- utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching;
 
-- match information needs and search strategies to appropriate search tools;
 
[…]
 
-- understand how information systems (i.e., collections of recorded information) are organized in order to access relevant information;
 
-- use different types of searching language (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) appropriately;
 
[…].
-- [usually] determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs;
 
-- [know how to] identify interested parties, such as scholars, organizations, governments, and industries, [and may do so];
 
-- [unsystematically] utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching;
 
-- [usually match] information needs and search strategies to appropriate search tools;
 
[…]
 
-- understand how (a small number of] information systems […] are organized in order to access relevant information;
 
-- use different types of searching language (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) [without conscious planning];
 
[…].
 
-- [often misjudge] the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs;
 
-- [know how to] identify interested […] organizations, […] who might produce information about a topic [but don’t routinely do so];
 
-- utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) […] thinking when searching; [selecting the best sources occurs late in the process]
 
-- [use only known] search strategies [and] search tools;
 
[…]
-- [understanding of] information systems [is limited;] access [to] relevant information [is limited];
 
-- […] searching language [varies but without planning or strategy];
 
[…].
 
-- [seem not to know how to] determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs;
 
-- [do not or do not know how to] identify interested parties, such as scholars, organizations, governments, [or] industries […];
 
-- utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) […] thinking when searching [without attention to quality of sources];
 
-- [rarely chang]  search tools [or] search strategies;
 
[…]
 
-- [do not or cannot articulate or fully exploit information systems’ organization];
 
-- […] searching language [is limited to natural language];
 
[…].
 
A zero is assigned to any research  artifact + reflection that does not attain Novice- level performance
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
  Text Box: Prompt: describe the biggest problem you faced as a researcher and how you got past it.
 

ACRL Frame:
    Information  
       as Strategic
       Exploration
 
Dispositions:Learners who are developing IL (exploratory) abilities
-- exhibit mental flexibility and creativity
 
-- understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results
 
-- realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search
 
-- seek guidance from experts, such as librarians, researchers, and professionals
 
-- recognize the value of browsing and other serendipitous methods of information gathering
 
-- persist in the face of search challenges, and know when they have enough information to complete the information task