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ACRL Framework rubric - Information has Value

The following rubric is one of three, all derived from the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (2016) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, that will begin the Bloomsburg University approval process in fall, 2017.  They have been developed for a required course for English majors at with an information literacy component; assessment is currently based on the Information Literacy VALUE Rubric (2009) of the American Association of Colleges & Universities. The rubrics have received some positive initial reception from the department and university communities.  They are published here to represent one conception of the ACRL Framework and, hopefully, to inspire dialogue and questioning.
 
The rubrics have four innovative features.  First, they organize the three components of the Framework – frame, dispositions, and knowledge practices – so that each rubric addresses one frame; the dispositions are treated as learning outcomes or objectives, and the knowledge practices are treated as descriptors (in this rubric, evidence of dispositional development).  Second, scorers are not limited to any one set of learning practices for assessing progress in acquiring dispositions, but can draw on any practice relevant to the disposition.  Third, the subject need not apply all or even most of the learning practices nor demonstrate acquisition of all the dispositions to attain an “expert” score; quality is more important than coverage. And fourth, each rubric is intended to be applied at once both to an artifact and to a structured reflection upon that artifact.  Sample prompts for reflections on all three rubrics are included on the last page.
 
Terry Riley
Bloomsburg University
 
ACRL Information Literacy Rubric
ENGLISH 203: Approaches to Literary Study
Concepts, Dispositions, and Knowledge Practices drawn from Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Three of the Framework’s six concepts included.  Modifications of language bracketed.  Bracketed ellipsis […] indicates Dispositions or Knowledge Practices excluded from the rubric.
Assessment should be based both on artifacts and student reflections; a single artifact and reflection could be sufficient, if the artifact is intellectually ambitious and purposeful, and if the reflection addresses two or more of the Frames.  Neither all the Dispositions nor all the Learning Practices need be represented for the student to score at the Expert level.
ACRL Frame:  
      Information  
      Has Value
 
ACRL Dispositions:
Learners who are developing IL [information value] abilities
ACRL Knowledge Practices
      (Expert:
        Capstone 4)
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL [information value] abilities
ACRL Knowledge         
Practices
          (Milestone 3)      
 
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL [information value] abilities
 ACRL Knowledge   
 Practices
          (Milestone 2)
 
 
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL [information value] abilities
 ACRL Knowledge   
 Practices
          (Novice:
             Benchmark 1)
            
Indicators of achievement:
Learners who are developing IL [information value]
abilities
Benchmark not met 0
-- respect the original ideas of others;
 
-- value the skills, time, and effort needed to produce knowledge;
 
-- see themselves as
contributors to the information
marketplace rather than only consumers of it;
 
-- are inclined to examine their own information privilege.
-- give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation;
 
[…]
 
-- articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain;
 
-- understand how and why some individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented or systematically marginalized within the systems that produce and disseminate information;
 
[…]
 
-- decide where and how their information is published;
 
[…]
 
-- make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information.
-- give credit to the original ideas of others through [some form of] attribution and citation;
 
[…]
 
-- [demonstrates a practical knowledge of] copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain;
 
-- understand [that] individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented […] within the systems that produce and
disseminate information;
 
[…]
 
-- [take some control over] where and how their information is published;
 
[…]
 
-- [usually] make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information.
-- (try to] give credit to the original ideas of
others [but have observable difficulties remembering or following basic procedures];
 
-- [may know that …] groups of individuals may be underrepresented […] within the systems that produce and disseminate information [but appear unable to see the implications];
 
[…]
 
-- [make hasty or questionable decisions about] where and how their information is published;
 
[…]
 
-- [sometimes] make [uninformed] choices regarding their online actions [and are not always fully aware] of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information.
-- [do not fully understand how to] give credit to the original ideas of others;
 
-- [does not appear to know that] individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented […] within the systems that produce and disseminate information;
 
[…]
 
-- [exert little control over] where and how their information is published;
 
[…]
 
-- [often] make [uninformed] choices regarding their online actions [and are not aware] of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information.
A zero is assigned to any research  artifact + reflection  that does not attain Novice- level performance.
 
 
 
 
 
ACRL Frame:  
      Information  
      Has Value
 
 
ACRL Dispositions:
Learners who are developing IL [information value] abilities
-- respect the original ideas of others;
 
-- value the skills, time, and effort needed to produce knowledge;
 
-- see themselves as
contributors to the information
marketplace rather than only consumers of it;
 
-- are inclined to examine their own information privilege.
 
 
 
Text Box: Prompts: who should read your project – who would benefit from it?
What field(s) have you contributed to?